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Efficient Commercial Refrigeration Measures Offered by Central Hudson Gas & Electric

  
  
  
  


Central HudsonCentral Hudson Gas & Electric Corp. has expanded its commercial electric energy efficiency program to include refrigeration measures for non-residential applications such as convenience stores, restaurants, cold storage facilities, wholesale distributors and schools. Central Hudson now provides incentives up to 70 percent of the total project cost to replace qualifying refrigeration equipment. This is the second addition to the program this year, with the exterior LED pole lighting added earlier this year.

Refrigeration measures are an ideal complement to our successful commercial lighting program,” said James P. Laurito, President of Central Hudson. “We recently added exterior LED pole lighting to the program, and featuring energy-efficient refrigeration will provide our Hudson Valley business owners with a comprehensive selection of energy solutions.

refrigeratorBusinesses, institutions and other non-residential customers are eligible for a free, no-obligation assessment by Central Hudson’s commercial energy efficiency program partner, Lime Energy. Participants also receive a comprehensive report providing recommended measures, installation costs, incentives and payback period. The new refrigeration measures include evaporator fan replacement motors, anti-sweat door heater controls, fan control and management systems, and LED refrigeration case lighting. Qualified customers are eligible to receive incentives up to 70 percent for these upgrades.

Replacing inefficient equipment and lighting can substantially reduce electric consumption, which will lower energy costs and help protect the environment,” Laurito added. “Plus, the LED lighting technology dramatically improves the look of freezers and coolers. The new refrigeration solutions are open to all new and former program participants.

Adam Procell, President and CEO of Lime Energy said refrigeration can account for almost 40 percent of total energy use in typical grocery and convenience stores. “This represents a large portion of a business owner’s monthly utility bill,” he said. “Improving the efficiency of commercial refrigeration equipment will help Hudson Valley businesses save money and make them more competitive in the marketplace.

Funding for the program is limited, and availability is on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, visit www.CentralHudsonRefrigeration.com, or call (855) 236-4832.

Four Reasons for Small Businesses to Choose LED Lighting

  
  
  
  

These days, it’s important for small businesses to stand out from the competition and create a setting that will give their customers confidence in dealing with them. One easy way to do that is to improve outdoor lighting around your business.

Well-designed outdoor lighting makes a property more attractive and inviting and enhances customers’ and employees’ comfort and security.

parking lot before after resized 600 

But exterior lighting costs can quickly add up.  Exterior lighting and street/parking lot lighting are fixtures that are generally on for a good part of the working day and are left on overnight when a business is not open.  This lighting is often required to be designed to provide good illumination, clear visibility at the same time not be too disruptive to the community in which the business operates. 

These challenges lead many businesses to work with their local utility to find options for installing functional, attractive lighting fixtures that won’t cost a fortune to operate.  It is these challenges precisely why more and more utilities are recommending, and offering incentives, for businesses to upgrade their lighting to LED technology.

Exterior LEDs for small businesses make smart sense for many reasons, but most businesses do not need much more convincing after hearing about the four reasons below:

  1. Cost
    For many businesses, lighting is on around the clock – whether the company is operating or not – and because of this energy bills can quickly add up.

    Many small businesses report seeing a reduction in energy costs in upwards of about
    65% in just the first year after upgrading lighting to LED.  While the significant reduction in energy costs is always attractive for small businesses, it’s still the upfront investment costs that detract some businesses from even looking into an upgrade.  Many businesses don’t realize that their utility probably has an incentive program that can reduce the installation costs by up to 70% and with specially designed financing programs, businesses can pay off the investment in a matter of months without a change to their bottom line.

  2. Maintenance
    What maintenance? LED technology is made to last 20-25 times longer than traditional lighting.  So while LED lights may cost more upfront, they last much longer than traditional bulbs which means businesses aren’t paying for more bulbs over the years and the costs to change those bulbs.  For exterior lighting this often involves renting special equipment to reach tall poll lighting.   Once an LED fixture is installed it will stay there, working perfectly normal, for years – not months.

  3. Safety
    Exterior lighting for parking lots and alley ways, in its nature, is supposed to be bright, but traditional exterior lighting, if not installed properly, can create glare and shadows making safety a greater concern.  The photo below shows before and after pictures of exterior spaces lit with traditional lighting vs LED lighting.  LEDs provide greater illumination with less light, so exterior areas are lit better, employees and patrons feel safer, making a business more attractive to customers. 

  4. Good Neighbor
    Lighting for safety and security can face some tricky challenges, especially for small businesses often located in residential neighborhoods.  Traditional fixtures use much more energy because the light is not directed in the place it needs to be.  With LED lighting, only specific areas are lit, directing light to those areas that need it and not to the areas that don’t, i.e. the sky.  With traditional light fixtures, at least 30 percent of the light coming out of the fixture is totally wasted. It is light going up to brighten the sky, and light coming out at nearly horizontal angles. Such light only causes glare and light trespass, doing nothing to light up the owner’s property, but doing a lot to offend neighbors. This wasted light is doing nothing to provide security, safety, or utility at night.

For small businesses looking to save money and become more competitive in today’s market, operating costs are the one line item that owners have the most control over.  Investing in efficiency measures, especially lighting, can make the biggest impact on a business’ bottom line.   To find out more about energy saving solutions for small businesses, visit our page on comprehensive measures.

Wall Street and Rankin Avenue parking garages get LED upgrades

  
  
  
  

Two City of Asheville parking garages will been seen in a different light thanks to the City of Asheville’s participation in a newly implemented energy efficiency program with Duke Energy Progress.

describe the imageUtilizing the Duke Energy Progress Small Business Energy Saver Program, the city will replace lights inside the Wall Street and Rankin Avenue parking garages with LED lighting. LED lighting is much more energy efficient than the high-pressure sodium lights currently being used, and the move will dramatically reduce the energy used by the facilities, resulting in significant utility savings to the City of Asheville.

Thanks to the SBES Program, the upgrade comes at a considerable savings to the City of Asheville. Duke Energy Progress will pick up 65 percent of the cost of the installation, leaving the city’s match at $47,510. With a projected savings of $20,000 per year, the project will pay for the city’s contribution in less than 36 months.

Since they run 24 hours a day, parking garage lights are a great candidate for energy reduction strategies. In all, 225 lights will be replaced in the two garages, with an energy reduction equal to the equivalent of 150 tons of carbon dioxide annually. The replacement will take place during December and is expected to be completed by the end of the year. The scope of work and impact of the work will be comparable to routine maintenance in the garages and is expected to create a minimum of disruption for holiday shoppers parking in the facilities.

This is an outstanding opportunity to advance the goals of reducing the City of Asheville’s carbon footprint in a very cost effective way,” said Kerby Smithson, Energy Analyst with the city’s Office of Sustainability. “And we are thankful to Duke Energy Progress for making this kind of partnership available to the city and to small businesses in the area.

The Wall Street and Rankin Avenue facilities are two of four parking garages operated by the City of Asheville. The city’s newest garage, on Biltmore Avenue beneath the Aloft hotel, was constructed using LED lighting.

Asheville City Council unanimously approved this partnership at its November 12 meeting. Council has set a goal of reducing carbon reduction goal from municipal operations 80% by 2030, and one of Council’s strategic goals is that Asheville be the southeastern leader in clean energy and environmental sustainability.

The City of Asheville’s Sustainability Office works throughout the City of Asheville organization to develop opportunities for reductions in municipal energy use.

For more information, go to ashevillenc.gov/green.

 

This article was originally published on 11/26/2013
http://coablog.ashevillenc.gov/2013/11/wall-street-and-rankin-avenue-parking-garages-to-get-led-upgrades 

New Jersey Small Business Direct Install Program in the News

  
  
  
  

Hillsdale Parish takes an Environmental Step

St. John the Baptist Parish converted all 443 incandescent 90W bulbs in the Church, Msgr. Morris Parish Center and Parish Office/Rectory to the more energy and cost effective LED bulbs.


St Johns

Approximately 170 bulbs were replaced in the church alone. Additional energy improvements included the replacement of the Boiler in the Parish Rectory with an Energy Star Lochinvar which has 94 percent efficiency rating.

All of the air conditioning units were replaced with the more efficient 14 SEER and use R410A Refrigerant which is more environmentally friendly. 

The effort began with a seminar held at the Archdiocesan Center in Newark presented by Lime Energy, a Direct Install provider based in Elk Horn Village, Ill. and managed by TRC Energy Services of Lowell, Mass. TRC is the market manager for the Energy Efficient segment of New Jersey's Clean Energy program.

The seminar was attended by Rev. John Korbelak, pastor of St. John the Baptist and Glen Ford, St. John's maintenance superintendent.

Lime Energy had been awarded a competitively bid contract from the State of New Jersey to implement the direct install component of New Jersey's Clean Energy program.

The program was delayed for a time due to Super Storm Sandy but recently became available again to St. John's and other non-profit organizations.

The appropriate application was filed and approved. The Energy Audit Program was completed which identified cost justified measures eligible for incentives on lighting, lighting controls and air conditioning equipment.

Installation of the program will result in energy and cost savings over the long term, the church explained in a press statement.

For further information contact Glen Ford, 201 664-3131 or click here for more information about the NJ Small Business Direct Install Program.

 

Article orginially appeared on Thursday, November 21, 2013:
http://www.northjersey.com/community/announcements/232782321_Hillsdale_parish_takes_an_environmental_step_Parish_takes_an_environmental_step.html

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Part 8

  
  
  
  

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Education - Part 8 of an 8 Part Series

classroomAt Lime Energy, we help utilities around the country bring energy efficiency to their small business customers.  With over 15,000 completed projects to date, we have learned a lot about the unique needs of small business customers.  Over an 8 part series, we are taking a look at several small business types and uncovering their potential for energy savings.  In many cases, these businesses are eligible for incentives from their utility to cover a large portion of the project cost, making the long-term benefits of energy efficiency even more attainable.

Education:  

The US Department of Energy reports that each year, taxpayers spend $6 billion on energy for the nation’s schools, which is both about 25% more than necessary and more than is spent on computers and textbooks combined. Energy costs are second only to personnel costs in K-12 budgets and the EPA estimates that $2 billion can be saved by improving energy efficiency in schools. Energy is also one of the few expenses that can be cut without affecting student instruction and in fact, energy efficiency actually creates brighter, safer and more comfortable learning environments.

energy use in schoolsSimilar to other business environments, schools have a great opportunity to implement both no-cost and low-cost options to improve the efficiency of their facilities.  Federal and utility incentive funding in many states make it possible to complete retrofit projects without significantly impacting budgets.  Often, the annual savings can be applied to other capital projects and instructional needs.  The following measures represent the greatest opportunity for schools to become energy efficient:
 

  1. Turn machines off. Every 1000 kWh saved by turning things off equates to a $100 power bill reduction.
     
  2. Take advantage of daylighting wherever possible.  In addition to lowering lighting expenditures, a study by the California Board for Energy Efficiency found that students exposed to natural daylight perform 20%-26% better on math and reading tests than those with no exposure to daylight.
     
  3. Utilize temperature setbacks to avoid unnecessarily heating or cooling unoccupied space.
     
  4. Use an economizer, which draws in cool air from outside when available and reduces the need for mechanically cooled air.
     
  5. Conduct regular and thorough maintenance, including changing air filters, checking cabinet panels on roof-top units, cleaning condenser coils and checking register airflow. If an economizer is in use, check, clean and lubricate once yearly to prevent it becoming stuck in the on position, which can add up to 50% to a building’s energy bill.
     
  6. Replace incandescent with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) wherever possible to save up to $20 per lamp annually.
     
  7. Retrofit T12 lamps and magnetic ballasts with T8s lamps and electronic ballasts to reduce energy use by up to 35%.
     
  8. Install LED exit signs to save as much as $20 per sign per year.
     
  9. Install occupancy sensors to dim or shut off in special use rooms such as auditoriums, staff lounges and storage spaces.
     
  10. Implement vending machine controls that power down vending machines when a space is unoccupied to save up to 50% of their annual electricity cost.
     
  11. When new equipment is needed, purchase Energy Star wherever available.  Schools that have earned the top Energy Star label for energy performance cost $0.40 less to operate than conventional schools.  (http://www.energystar.gov/ia/business/challenge/learn_more/Schools.pdf)
     
  12. Consider demand-controlled ventilation, in which carbon dioxide sensors monitor occupancy in real-time and adjust the amount of air being supplied to a space based on occupancy.  As the fans only run when outside air is needed, less energy is consumed.

For a detailed review of these measures and their application in your learning facility, schedule an energy audit with a qualified contractor today.  From incentive programs to equipment rebates and recycling, local utilities may provide assistance in determining how best to implement energy efficiency solutions.  To learn more about programs available in your area, visit www.lime-energy.com/smallbusiness

For the Environmental Protection Agency’s Energy Efficiency Programs in K-12 Schools Guide, please visit http://www.epa.gov/statelocalclimate/documents/pdf/k-12_guide.pdf.

 

For more on small business energy efficiency:

Part 1 - Grocery & Convenience Store Energy Efficiency

Part 2 - Retail Store Energy Efficiency

Part 3 - Automotive Dealership Energy Efficiency

Part 4 - Restaurant Energy Efficiency

Part 5 - Office Space Energy Efficiency

Part 6 - Manufacturing Energy Efficiency

Part 7 - Medical and Dental Office Energy Efficiency

Part 8 -  Energy Efficiency in Education


One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Part 7

  
  
  
  

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Medical and Dental Offices - Part 7 of an 8 Part Series

doctorAt Lime Energy, we help utilities around the country bring energy efficiency to their small business customers.  With over 15,000 completed projects to date, we have learned a lot about the unique needs of small business customers.  Over an 8 part series, we are taking a look at several small business types and uncovering their potential for energy savings.  In many cases, these businesses are eligible for incentives from their utility to cover a large portion of the project cost, making the long-term benefits of energy efficiency even more attainable.

 

Medical and Dental Offices:  

While similar to general office spaces in their ability to achieve energy savings via lighting, controls and HVAC measures, patient care offices also have unique needs relative to their equipment choices.  The EPA estimates that every dollar a medical office saves on energy is equivalent to generating $10 in new revenues.  When implementing an energy efficiency plan, the following action items are recommended:

  1. Turn machines off. Every 1000 kWh saved by turning things off equates to a $100 power bill reduction.
  2. Replace incandescent with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in downlights, sconces, task lights, and wall lighting.
  3. Retrofit T12 lamps with T8s, which last longer and require less maintenance. In addition to saving energy, T8 bulbs have an improved color rendering index (CRI) that is more pleasant for office environments. 
  4. Install LED bulbs. Due to their high efficiency, they’re particularly efficient and successful in filtered sources like exit signs. Their small size and directional nature make them a good choice for task lighting, too.
  5. Install occupancy sensors to dim or shut off lights in restrooms, halls and conference rooms and other sporadically used spaces.
  6. When new equipment is needed, purchase Energy Star wherever available (www.energystar.gov). Practice Greenhealth also offers resources for purchasing environmentally preferable products and equipment, including a list of RFP/RFI questions (www.practicegreenhealth.org).
  7. Install programmable thermostats and adopt an office wide policy of 74⁰ in the summer and 68⁰ F in the winter.  Additionally, adjust the temperatures so that the office is not heated or cooled unnecessarily when unoccupied. 
  8. Properly maintain HVAC systems.  Clogged ducts and vents, improper seals, leaks, dirty coils and faulty equipment all contribute to wasted energy. Hire a certified technician to inspect HVAC systems twice per year. In addition, consider replacing any units that are over 10 years old to save 20% or more on energy use.
  9. Inspect window and door caulking annually, and upgrade windows that are over 10 years old to double-paned glass. Window-tinting, especially on south facing windows, can also be highly effective against heat gain.
  10. Add insulation to walls, crawl spaces and roofs to prevent excessive heat loss in the winter and heat gain in the summer. 
     

For a detailed review of these measures and their application in your practice, schedule an energy audit with a qualified contractor today.  From incentive programs to equipment rebates and recycling, local utilities may provide assistance in determining how best to implement energy efficiency solutions.  To learn more about programs available in your area, visit www.lime-energy.com/smallbusiness.

 

For more on small business energy efficiency:

Part 1 - Grocery and Convenience Store Energy Efficiency

Part 2 - Retail Store Energy Efficiency

Part 3 - Automotive Dealership Energy Efficiency

Part 4 - Restaurant Energy Efficiency

Part 5 - Office Space Energy Efficiency

Part 6 - Manufacturing Facility Energy Efficiency

Part 7 - Medical and Dental Office Energy Efficiency

Part 8 -  Energy Efficiency in Education


 

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Part 6

  
  
  
  

One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Manufacturing Facilities - Part 6 of an 8 Part Series

manufacturing facilityAt Lime Energy, we help utilities around the country bring energy efficiency to their small and mid-sized commercial customers.  With over 15,000 completed projects to date, we have learned a lot about the unique needs of these businesses.  Over an 8 week period, we are taking a look at several business types and uncovering their potential for energy savings.  In many cases, these businesses are eligible for incentives from their utility to cover a large portion of the project cost, making the long-term benefits of energy efficiency even more attainable.

Manufacturing Facilities:

Industrial energy use is responsible for nearly 30% of both energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the United States.  The Department of Energy estimates that common plant systems use about 80% of all industrial energy and that it’s possible for manufacturers of all sizes to achieve up to a 20% reduction in energy use in motors and pumps, compressed air systems, steam generation and process heating.  The following short-term and long-term solutions offer significant savings for manufacturers:

Short-Term:

    • Turn things off.  For every 1,000 kwh you save by turning off equipment, you save $100 on your utility bill.  Take a walk through your plant after hours and look for the following items that are most often left running when not in use:
      • Motors
      • Computers and office equipment
      • Space heaters
      • Lights
      • Outside-air intake systems
         
    • Turn things down.  Equipment that  cannot be completely powered down can be run at minimum levels or enhanced by controls when not in active use to save energy:
      • HVAC
      • Lighting
      • Vending machines
         
    • Perform regular maintenance and cleaning on all plant equipment to save energy and prolong lifespans.  Pay particular attention to:
      • Process heating
      • Motors
      • Fans, bearings and belts
      • Boilers
      • Air compressors
      • Air filters
      • Condenser coils

          Long-term:

          • Process heating – accounting for nearly 1/3 of facility energy use, careful monitoring and maintenance of this equipment will have a large impact on energy savings.  Three main areas for improvement include:
            • Installing furnace pressure controllers to maintain positive pressure and allow less cool air to infiltrate the heating system. 
            • Install lower flammable limit (LFL) monitoring equipment adjust ventilation rates according to system needs, which maintains safe ventilation ratios while saving energy.
               
          • Motors – Accounting for almost 70% of energy use in manufacturing plants, improving their efficiency will dramatically reduce the amount of energy wasted.  Considerations for energy efficient motors include:
              •  Choosing a properly sized motor based on the load duration curve (LDC) instead of the highest anticipated load. 
              • Improve input power by adding capacitors
              • Minimize voltage imbalances to reduce equipment performance losses
              • Install high-efficiency motors when replacing old equipment.
              • Install variable speed drives to adjust for load changes
                 
            • Compressed Air – Contributing to about 10% of overall energy consumption, systems that are poorly maintained contribute to higher bills and wasted energy. Areas for improvement include:
              • Load matching – don’t generate compressed air higher than the pressure required to reduce energy use by as much as 50%.
              • Research alternative technology – using low pressure blowers or fans in appropriate applications where compressed air isn’t truly needed. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        

            manufacturing energy efficiency


            While lighting and HVAC systems are relatively small contributors to overall energy use in a manufacturing facility, they present excellent opportunities for energy efficiency upgrades that will lower costs without interfering with plant operations.  



            • Upgrading to energy efficient plant lighting, incorporating lighting controls, installing LED signage and redesigning parking lot lighting are all simple and cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption.
            • HVAC systems also provide opportunities for reduction by minimizing air infiltration, incorporating radiant heaters, improving air circulation with large ceiling fans and deploying reflective roof coatings.

            Wondering if lighting and mechanical energy efficiency upgrades can really have a big impact in your manufacturing facility? Consider this:  In the Hudson Valley, Central Hudson Gas & Electric has provided incentives to almost 70 industrial facilities within the past year, resulting in an average annual saving of 29,500 kWh and almost $4,000 per year.  From incentive programs to equipment rebates and recycling, many  local utilities like Central Hudson provide assistance in determining how best to implement energy efficiency solutions.  To learn more about programs available in your area, visit www.lime-energy.com/smallbusiness.

             

            Sources: www.eere.energy.gov, www.esource.com, www.energystar.gov


            For more on small business energy efficiency:

            Part 1 - Grocery and Convenience Store Energy Efficiency

            Part 2 - Retail Store Energy Efficiency

            Part 3 - Automotive Dealership Energy Efficiency

            Part 4 - Restaurant Energy Efficiency

            Part 5 - Office Space Energy Efficiency

            Part 6 - Manufacturing Facility Energy Efficiency

            Part 7 - Medical and Dental Office Energy Efficiency

            Part 8 - Energy Efficiency in Education


             

            One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Part 5

              
              
              
              

            One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Part 5 of an 8 Part Series – Article Originally Appeared in-print and online in High Rise Facilities Magazine, June 2013 (highrisefacilities.com)

            Office SpaceAt Lime Energy, we help utilities around the country bring energy efficiency to their small business customers. With over 15,000 completed projects to date, we have learned a lot about the unique needs of small business customers. In this series, we are taking a look at several small business types and uncovering their potential for energy savings. In many cases, these businesses are eligible for incentives from their utility to cover a large portion of the project cost, making the long-term benefits of energy efficiency even more attainable.

            Office Space: 

            While high-rise buildings have unique energy-efficiency challenges relative to occupancy and ownership, there is significant evidence that energy reduction not only saves money for building owners and operators, but also increases property value.

            According to the Institute for Market Transformation, lower energy costs translate to higher returns. Energy-efficient properties have higher occupancy levels, lease-up rates, and sale prices than less efficient properties. Tenants and real estate investors are demanding energy efficiency, sometimes paying a premium to lease or own space where energy costs are lower. Banks and insurance companies are beginning to reward energy efficiency with better financing and lower premiums.

            Energy Use in Commercial BuildingsBecause it’s the most significant contributor to energy use, lighting also presents the most opportunity for savings.

            Not only does inefficient lighting contribute to wasted energy, the by-products of poor lighting further support the need for retrofits and upgrades: excessive heat gain, low power quality, decreased occupant comfort, etc.

            The following lighting measures are applicable to high-rise commercial buildings, and represent the opportunity to save up to 30 percent in energy costs:

            Retrofit T12 lamps with T8s, which last longer and require less maintenance. Increased lighting quality from these lamps will decrease the number of fixtures needed per square foot. If replacement is an option, consider T5 lamps, which offer even higher performance and better optical control.

            Replace magnetic ballasts with electronic ballasts to increase efficiency by as much as 30 percent. Electronic ballasts enable dimming and remote control, and have saved an estimated $15 billion in commercial buildings energy use since 2005.

            Install occupancy and/or photosensor controls to dim or shut off lights when natural light or inactivity renders them unnecessary. Digital lighting controls are also gaining momentum in high-occupancy commercial settings. Their flexibility is ideally suited to spaces with occupancy churn because they enable automated management and configuration via software vs. rewiring.

            Incorporate daylighting. It can be brought into a building through conventional glazing, light shelves, skylights, clerestory windows, light pipes, or specialized reflective materials. When utilizing daylighting, it’s important to also eliminate glare and put controls in place that reduce electric lighting when daylight is present.

            Replace incandescent with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in downlights, sconces, task lights, and wall washers. Screw-in CFLs are basic one-for-one lamp replacements, but most commercial settings utilize pin-base CFLs, which are used with a separate ballast. Pin-base systems are hardwired into the socket, which prevents the occupant from reverting back to incandescents. They’re available in a lower-power version to replace incandescent lamps, and a higher-power version to replace linear fluorescent or HID lamps.

            Consider LEDs. While the initial cost of LEDs is considerably higher, they’re viable for specific applications. Due to their high efficiency, they’re particularly efficient and successful in filtered sources like exit signs. Their small size and directional nature make them a good choice for task lighting, too.

            Due to the complex and comprehensive nature of high-rise facilities, as you put some of these ideas into practice, remember that a whole-system approach and proper commissioning are essential bookends to the lighting energy-efficiency process.

            Marriott Headquarters AtriumLED Lighting Brings Energy and Labor Savings to Marriott Headquarters

            Last year, LED lighting systems were installed in several locations at Marriott International’s headquarters located in Bethesda, Md. The installations have enriched lighting quality, heightened employee security and improved energy efficiency.

            Following its corporate campus-wide lighting update, Marriott now uses 860,000 fewer kilowatt hours (kWhs) of electricity and has saved more than $120,000 in combined energy and maintenance in just one year.

            In an example of savings that go beyond electricty, special scaffolding was needed to reach fixtures in the high ceiling of the foyer (pictured). Marriott would change the lights, which lasted just one to two years on average, once a year at a cost close to $3,000. The maintenance savings is already adding up after Marriot replaced 12 90-watt bulbs with 20-watt LED PAR38 lamps. Rated for 50,000 hours of life, the new LEDs may keep the scaffolding away for up to seven years.

            Marriott’s comprehensive LED update has decreased annual electricity use by 66 percent (680,000 kWhs outside; 180,000 kWhs inside) at its headquarters, slashing energy expense an estimated $104,000. Maintenance mitigation will yield an additional $210,000 savings over the next decade for a total return exceeding $120,000 a year. Marriott will also receive more than $130,000 in utility rebates and EPACT savings. All told, the anticipated payback period for the lighting project is slightly more than two years, based on combined electricity, maintenance and labor reductions.

             

            Article originally published in High Rise Facilities Magazine, June 11, 2013

            hrf logo top


            For more on small business energy efficiency:

            Part 1 - Grocery and Convenience Store Energy Efficiency

            Part 2 - Retail Store Energy Efficiency

            Part 3 - Automotive Dealership Energy Efficiency

            Part 4 - Restaurant Energy Efficiency

            Part 5 - Office Space Energy Efficiency

            Part 6 - Manufacturing Facility Energy Efficiency

            Part 7 - Medical and Dental Office Energy Efficiency

            Part 8 - Energy Efficiency in Education

             

            One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Part 4

              
              
              
              

            One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Restaurants - Part 4 of an 8 Part Series

            Restaurant Energy EfficiencyAt Lime Energy, we help utilities around the country bring energy efficiency to their small business customers.  With over 15,000 completed projects to date, we have learned a lot about the unique needs of small business customers.  In this series, we are taking a look at several small business types and uncovering their potential for energy savings.  In many cases, these businesses are eligible for incentives from their utility to cover a large portion of the project cost, making the long-term benefits of energy efficiency even more attainable.

            Restaurants:  

            Restaurants use 5-7 times more energy per square foot than other commercial buildings and the United States EPA estimates that when a restaurant cuts its energy costs by 20%, its profits could increase by 30% or more.

            energy use in restaurants 

            Unlike offices and retail stores where lighting upgrades can have the most significant impact on the bottom line, restaurants use the bulk of their energy during food prep.  For example, an average deep fryer uses more than 18,000 kWh and costs around $1800 per year to operate.  In order to maximize the efficiency of food prep equipment, follow these 5 guidelines:

            1. Reduce idle time.  Keeping equipment on when it isn’t in use costs money and wastes energy.  As the first step in managing energy use, implement a startup and shutdown schedule for energy intensive equipment like broilers, fryers, and ranges.
            2. Maintenance.  Energy leakage costs money and improper seals, leaks, dirty coils and faulty equipment all contribute to wasted energy.  Incorporating a regular cleaning and maintenance schedule for all equipment will significantly improve efficiency.
            3. Proper calibration of equipment.  Perform a regular thermostat check to be sure that your freezers, refrigerators, appliances, dishwashers and hot water heaters are operating at their optimal temperatures.
            4. Install variable speed controls on your exhaust hood to dramatically reduce the run time for fans.
            5. Buy Energy STAR certified equipment when replacement becomes necessary.  Fryers, steamers, convection ovens, griddles, broilers, combination ovens, ranges, reach-in refrigerators and freezers, walk-in refrigerators and freezers and ice machines are all available with an Energy STAR certification.

            In addition to savings on energy use in food preparation and storage, restaurants can also save money each month by incorporating lighting and HVAC efficiency into their footprint.  Common lighting upgrades include replacing T12 lamps and electronic ballasts with T8 lamps and magnetic ballasts, replacing exit and incandescent or neon signage with LED signage, and installing occupancy sensors for low traffic areas.  Programmable thermostats are an inexpensive upgrade for better HVAC efficiency, along with proper maintenance and cleaning protocols. When considering a replacement, Energy STAR HVAC systems offer significant savings over the life of the equipment.

            For a detailed review of these measures and their application in the dealership, visit http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/publications/pubdocs/restaurants_guide.pdf?5247-ddef  or schedule an energy audit with a qualified contractor today.  From incentive programs to equipment rebates and recycling, local utilities may provide assistance in determining how best to implement energy efficiency solutions.  To learn more about programs available in your area, visit http://info.lime-energy.com/small-business.

             

            For more on small business energy efficiency:

            Part 1 - Grocery and Convenience Store Energy Efficiency

            Part 2 - Retail Store Energy Efficiency

            Part 3 - Automotive Dealership Energy Efficiency

            Part 4 - Restaurant Energy Efficiency

            Part 5 - Office Space Energy Efficiency

            Part 6 - Manufacturing Facility Energy Efficiency

            Part 7 - Medical & Dental Office Energy Efficiency

            Part 8 - Energy Efficiency in Education

            One Size Doesn't Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Part 3

              
              
              
              

            One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Energy Efficiency for Small Businesses – Automotive Dealerships - Part 3 of an 8 Week Series

            auto smallAt Lime Energy, we help utilities around the country bring energy efficiency to their small business customers. With over 15,000 completed projects to date, we have learned a lot about the unique needs of small business customers. Over an 8 week period, we are taking a look at several small business types and uncovering their potential for energy savings. In many cases, these businesses are eligible for incentives from their utility to cover a large portion of the project cost, making the long-term benefits of energy efficiency even more attainable.

            Automotive Dealerships:

            Car dealerships have unique demands when it comes to energy consumption. An average car dealership uses 18% more energy per square foot than a typical office building due to several factors:

            • Open 60 hours or more per week
            • Large, lighted parking lots
            • Bright lights and cool temperatures needed in multiple areas
            • Expansive glass and window areas
            • Volume of foot traffic in and out
            • Extended use of shop and office equipment

            These factors create a high potential for wasted energy due to inefficient lighting and mechanical systems, heat loss and high energy use of mechanical equipment. In fact, the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) reports that energy is the third highest operating expense for dealerships and that an industry-wide 10% reduction in energy consumption would result in $193 million in utility cost savings and 1 million tons of carbon dioxide emissions. In conjunction with Energy STAR, NADA evaluated all major areas of a dealership and identified multiple opportunities for savings in each location in their study “Putting Energy into Profits.

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            For a detailed review of these measures and their application in the dealership, visit www.energystar.gov/autodealers or schedule an energy audit with a qualified contractor today. From incentive programs to equipment rebates and recycling, local utilities may provide assistance in determining how best to implement energy efficiency solutions.The following measures represent opportunities for savings in existing dealerships:

            1. High efficiency HVAC equipment
            2. T8 fluorescent lamps and electronic ballasts
            3. T5 fluorescent lamps and electronic ballasts in low-bay applications
            4. Metal halide lamps for exterior, security and high-bay lighting
            5. Compact fluorescent fixtures and bulbs in place of recessed can fixtures and incandescent bulbs
            6. Daylight controls on all exterior lighting
            7. LED Exit signs
            8. Occupancy sensors for all low-traffic areas
            9. High-efficiency motors and variable speed drives in all machinery
            10. Efficient office equipment and appliances
               

            To learn more about programs available in your area, visit www.lime-energy.com/smallbusiness or check out how Jim saved money at his dealership here:

             

            For more on small business energy efficiency:

            Part 1 - Grocery and Convenience Store Energy Efficiency

            Part 2- Retail Store Energy Efficiency

            Part 3 - Automotive Dealership Energy Efficiency

            Part 4 - Restaurant Energy Efficiency

            Part 5 - Office Space Energy Efficiency

            Part 6 - Manufacturing Facility Energy Efficiency

            Part 7 - Medical & Dental Office Energy Efficiency

            Part 8 - Energy Efficiency in Education


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